Miril Screenshots

Everybody likes screenshots, so here are some of Miril, the static content management system written in perl:

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Announcing Miril, a Static Content Management System in Modern Perl

I am proud to announce the availability on CPAN of my latest project, Miril. Miril is a static content management system - it takes data from some source, e.g. a database or plain-text files, and generates static html. What makes Miril different from other tools that do a similar job (such as ruby's Jekyll or homegrown solutions using the Template Toolkit), is that it provides a nice user interface for editing and managing content and you can safely install it for non-geeks to use.

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Perl Blog Aggregators: Statistics and Joining

Within the next week or so I am planning to announce the launch of an open-source perl project I have been working on recently and I want to create some publicity within the community. My blog currently appears only in the Planet Perl Iron Man feed, so I thought I should look into some other aggregators and get my blog included there too. There are two major problems I encountered that I want to share.

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If Dynamic Languages Were That Great, Why Doesn't Everybody Use Them?

A friend of mine, a pretty good java and C# programmer, recently asked me this question while I was advocating the merits of perl and of dynamic languages in general. Why don't universities pay proper attention to dynamic languages? Why do software companies, which are run by smart people and employ smart people, use java and C# rather than dynamic languages for the enterprise systems they develop? Why are dynamic languages used as niche tools only (e.g. perl for system administration, or RoR for quick websites), and usually because an individual pushed for their use rather then because of company policy?

I promptly replied that platforms such as java and .NET are backed by billion-dollar companies that spend enormous amounts of money convincing people that their software is superior. But even as I said it, this explanation felt somewhat insufficient to me. The question has been haunting me ever since, and gradually a somewhat unexpected realization dawned on me.

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